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Brain Food


Healthy food

Healthy food (Photo credit: jpockele)

Nestlé invests in US brain food maker: ‘This is a big strategic move for us’.

Resveratrol could enhance exercise performance


Resveratrol was first isolated from Senna quin...

Resveratrol was first isolated from Senna quinquangulata (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

More good news about the potential health benefits of resveratrol from a study just published in the Journal of Physiology.

Resveratrol could enhance exercise performance.

Red Wine Increases Lifespan, Says New Study | WorldHealth.net Anti-Aging Forum


Glass of wine, selective focus, space for copy...

Red Wine Increases Lifespan, Says New Study | WorldHealth.net Anti-Aging Forum.

Recognizing Signs of Alzheimer’s In Patients


Combination of two brain diagrams in one for c...

Combination of two brain diagrams in one for comparison. In the left normal brain, in the right brain of a person with Alzheimer’s disease English: Diagram of the brain of a person with Alzheimer’s Disease English: Diagram of a normal brain Русский: Изображение нормального мозга и мозга при болезни Альцгеймера Nederlands: Vergelijking van normale hersenen (links) met die van een alzheimerpatiënt.(rechts) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Alzheimer’s disease is a common type of dementia that gradually gets worse over time. The main thing affected by Alzheimer’s is a person’s memory and cognitive abilities. There are 3 stages of Alzheimer’s disease: mild, moderate, and severe. Typically, a person will live 8-10 years after being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease, but every case is different, and people can live much longer.

Here are some recognizing signs of Alzheimer’s in patients:

• Memory loss – Memory loss is the most common sign of Alzheimer’s disease, especially forgetting things that a person recently learned. If a person asks for the same information over and over, it is a sign of Alzheimer’s.

• Problem solving and concentration – If a person struggles with solving problems in his or her daily life or has problems concentrating with no prior history of such problems, this may be a sign of Alzheimer’s.If things take longer to do than they typically did before, this may be another sign.

• Hard time completing daily tasks – Frequently, a person with Alzheimer’s has a hard time completing daily tasks such as remembering a recipe that they have made many times before or balancing a checkbook.

• Vision problems – Vision problems can be one sign of Alzheimer’s disease in some people. Having a hard time reading or judging distances can be a sign.

• Time confusion – A person with Alzheimer’s disease may be confused about the time or the passage of time. Such a person may have a hard time determining when an event happened, whether it was immediately right before or a longer time in the past.

• Place confusion – One of the common signs of Alzheimer’s is if a person is confused where they are and how they got there.

• Lack of good judgment – One sign of Alzheimer’s in patients is lack of good judgment and a lack of good decision-making. Paying less attention to details such as personal grooming and eating right is a sign to look for.

• Speech problems – This is not having trouble speaking or not vocalizing. An Alzheimer’s patient may not be able to follow a conversation or may repeat something he or she has already said. Patients may also not be able to find the right word for something or may call things by the wrong name.

• Misplacing things – One sign of Alzheimer’s disease is misplacing things and being unable to find them or putting things in strange places where they do not typically belong.

• Mood changes – People with Alzheimer’s can experience mood changes from mild to severe. They can become more easily irritated because of what they are experiencing. Thus, they become frustrated and confused.

• Social withdrawal – Withdrawing from such things as hobbies, work, activities, and friends and family can be a sign of Alzheimer’s in patients.

It’s important to seek memory care right away when you see any warning signs.

National Plan to Address Alzheimer’s Disease


PET scan of a human brain with Alzheimer's disease

PET scan of a human brain with Alzheimer’s disease (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Here it is-our national plan to address Alzheimer’s Disease. The goal is to prevent and effectively treat Alzheimer’s by 2025. Follow this link to have access to the full report.

 

http://aspe.hhs.gov/daltcp/napa/NatlPlan.pdf

 

You’re Looking at Me Like I Live Here and I Don’t | Documentary about Alzheimer’s | Independent Lens | PBS


Combination of two brain diagrams in one for c...

Combination of two brain diagrams in one for comparison. In the left normal brain, in the right brain of a person with Alzheimer's disease English: Diagram of the brain of a person with Alzheimer's Disease English: Diagram of a normal brain (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Interesting documentary into a woman’s personal struggle with Alzheimer’s Disease. Definitely worth watching and sharing!

You’re Looking at Me Like I Live Here and I Don’t | Documentary about Alzheimer’s | Independent Lens | PBS.

Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care Program


Alzheimer's Disease

Alzheimer's Disease (Photo credit: AJC1)

UCLA introduces a new Alzheimer’s and dementia care program that targets the needs of the patient as well as those of the caregiver who often is a family member.

The UCLA Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care program will have three main components: creation of a dementia registry; a needs assessment of patients listed in the registry; and individualized dementia care plans based on those assessments.

Click on this link to watch a short introductory video on this exciting program.

 

http://youtu.be/mr2P-opL8Hk

Brain Awareness Week Activities


Yesterday at the Parc we had such a fabulous event as we celebrated Brain Awareness Week 2012! We discussed ways to promote brain health and engaged in some fun and interactive brain fitness activities. Check out some of our photos. By the way, what do you think of our brain erasers?

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Brain Boosters-Split States


English: The United States Esperanto: Loko de ...

Image via Wikipedia

Welcome! You must be here as you are ready for some stimulating and challenging brain fitness activities designed to help you build that cognitive reserve and stave off dementia or Alzheimer’s!  Here is a fun and different brain exercise that is designed to target the areas of thought organization, executive function,  and attention/focus. This brain game is  for all ages to enjoy. Just yesterday a group of seniors had a blast with this activity, as I know you will too. Remember, your brain just like your body requires exercise to maintain optimal level  health and fitness.

Ready? Hidden within this string of letters you will find the names of 3 U.S States. You must use all the letters and not change the order of any of the letters. The names of the states are in the correct order-not scrambled. Have fun while exercising your brain!

 

MWIIMSNCANOENSSIONETIAN

Want a Healthy Brain For Life?


If you are reading this, then you are committed to your brain health!  As you know, we must not take our brain health for granted. Just like our bodies, we must properly care for and nurture our brains. This includes physical exercise, proper brain nutrition, social interactions, and of course brain exercises.

You do not have to be an athlete or have a health club membership to exercise. Walking is free and requires no special skills or equipment.  Studies have shown some significant brain benefits  just by walking 3x/week for 35 minutes! Individuals actually experienced an increase in the size of the hippocampus. You may ask, “What is a hippocampus?”  The hippocampus is the area of your brain responsible for memory. That’s pretty important, don’t you agree? After all, who of us isn’t interested in improving our memory skills? So, get some exercise!

Eating a healthy diet is also crucial for good brain health. Foods like fresh fruits and vegetables-berries, apples, green leafy veggies, omega 3 fatty foods like salmon, nuts-walnuts and almonds, lean meats, green tea. Try to avoid sugar! Sugar just doesn’t have any health benefits.  Several new studies are actually suggesting that  Alzheimer’s is diabetes of the brain. Do yourself and your brain a favor and get rid of the sugar!

Social connections are an integral part of maintaining brain health. Do you actively participate in social groups? How about starting a book, movie, investment, or cooking club? Do you have any hobbies? How do you spend your time when not at work? What fun activities have you done lately? Be involved with people and remember that humans are social creatures.

The last crucial component necessary to maintain a healthy brain throughout your lifetime involves brain exercises. By engaging in new and challenging mental activities, you are able to form new neural pathways. Forming new pathways in the brain, helps improve our overall cognitive skills. So, if you are an expert at crossword puzzles or sudoku , it’s time for something new. Ever considered learning a new language or learning to play bridge? Both are excellent ways to exercise your brain. Of course, you can always enroll in a BrainMasters class where we will most assuredly exercise your brain!

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